Time to Smile: Emoji Support!

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Japanese for “picture word”, Emoji are often pictographs—images of things like faces , weather , emotions  or activities . They arrived on the scene in Japan  long before they were popularized in North America via the smartphone. The humble emoticon :) is its predecessor.

Both emoji and emoticons do one thing well, they express an emotion  or idea succinctly . They’ve become part of the way we speak  online and they aren’t going away. You might be surprised to learn that there are several international Emoji standards for cross-device  consistency. This is serious business .

Today, we’re happy to announce that Recollective now natively supports emoji and emoticons across the entire application. This is a benefit to both participants and study moderators when it comes to getting across meaning , feeling and personality . Continue reading

Bias In Research Communities

Online communities change the way we think about ourselves and those around us.

I was recently discussing this with a friend of mine, through Facebook chat, of course. She is a researcher in a psychology study (currently under review) that found Facebook users often experience jealousy and a certain degree of dissatisfaction with the current state of their lives as a result of exposure to other users’ posts.

People in our online social networks typically only post (i.e. promote) positive aspects of their lives that effectively creates the illusion of a failure-free population. When we occupy these networks our perceived flaws or failures are magnified in the absence of other similar lived and shared experiences.

This study is an intriguing example of a community’s collective bias on a massive scale. The social climate, not necessarily the forum or network itself, encourages positive contributions while discouraging negatives ones (arguably to our own personal and social detriment). Continue reading