7 things to consider when planning your research

Ad-hoc or short term communities provide you with a lot of flexibility through the robustness of the tools available on platforms like Recollective. Using these platforms, conducting agile qualitative research can quickly become your ‘go to’ methodology, but it’s not without challenges. Considerations to balance against that flexibility are questions about the appropriate types of activities, how much you should be asking participants to do on a daily basis and the length of time your project should run.

Getting these things clear in your mind when scoping and designing your project are crucial.  If not, there could be cost implications, timing implications and there is potential for participants and your own researchers to be stretched too thin.

We’ve run thousands of projects on Recollective and had a chance to observe what works and what doesn’t. Here are a few tips based on that experience to help guide you: Continue reading

Long-term Research Communities

Research communities are now a tried and true methodology; proven to be a flexible and efficient way to conduct qualitative research and get closer to customers. That said, short-term and long-term communities are different animals and need to be treated as such. This short blog post is meant to give you a little guidance when thinking about and planning your long-term research communities. Continue reading

The Power of the Platform – getting closer to your clients

This post is from Dr. Nick Anderson, a psychologist at Dr-Groks, who has spent his career helping brands all over the world to understand the complexity and apparent irrationality of their consumers and apply sound psychological principles to create impactful product design and communications.

 

Qualitative research is about relationships.

In our research-lives the relationships we have with consumers and end-users is central to getting our jobs done. The better we can know them, and get them to share their lives, behaviours, and beliefs with us – the more astute our insights become and the better our work is as a result.

Lots has been written already about how online platforms can help us connect with our consumers, but there has been relatively little mentioned about how a well run platform like Recollective helps with client relationships too.

For me, the relationship I have with my client-partner is just as important as the ones I have with my consumers. The more honest and authentic this relationship is, the more we feel like partners, and the more focused (and fun) the work is.

Here are 3 ways an online platform is a great client-friendly approach to research. Continue reading

Research on Research at IIeX

As always, IIeX was a great experience for the entire Recollective team and for me, personally.  We made some great connections, learned a lot and participated in collaborative problem solving.

Part of the experience for us was hosting a roundtable with people who participate in marketing research studies. We did this to further our ongoing conversation about what our industry is like for them. Our goal is to create a more open dialogue between our side of the industry and theirs; the hope being that we can work towards some foundational shifts in our thinking and find some solutions to our shared problems with quality and trust.

First, as a reminder, this wouldn’t have been possible without the help and support of our industry. I’d like to give a personal thank you to:

While Jessica Broome and I conceptualized and brought this to life we never would have been able to do this without help…  lots and lots of help! Continue reading

Symbiotic Trends at IIeX 2016

iiex-featured-image-largeA couple of weeks ago we were basking in the sunshine and heat of Atlanta, attending the Insight Innovation Exchange (IIeX) conference. Each year provides a fantastic opportunity to not only meet new and existing customers, but to also soak up some great presentations by speakers from North America.

This year three themes struck me as particularly prominent:

  1. Visceral visualization – Virtual environments and more robust media in general
  2. Interrogating respondent’s implicit motivations and feelings
  3. Automation of analysis

Continue reading

Innovation In A Box: Recollective Case Study

We’re delighted to have Brent Schmidt, CEO of Strategic Fuel, contribute to our blog this month and share his case study of their very first Recollective-based project.

Clients: Juice Inc. and Strategic Fuel

Juice Inc:
Is a corporate training company that believes energized and engaged employees fuel great customer experiences and better business results. That’s why the organization places a focus on ideas, skills and tools people can put to use immediately.

Strategic Fuel:
Driven by the challenge of bringing leaders, teams and customers onto the same page, Strategic Fuel takes a creative and collaborative approach to craft an insight-driven shared focus and direction for organizations and teams. Juice Inc. is a client of Strategic Fuel.

Challenge:
There were a few different challenges in play. Continue reading

Research Community: Build Meaningful Interactions with Younger Audiences

For interesting results, mix teenagers with a dash of alcohol in an online research community, garnish with lime (or the branding of your choice).

Recently, the team here at Recollective supported that kind of cocktail community and it highlighted several key advantages of communities and online qual in general. Namely:

  1. The Safety of a Virtual Environment
  2. The Value of Familiar Surroundings
  3. Respondent Attention Retention

The community ran over 2 weeks with 20 participants. It aimed to establish a comprehensive understanding of recently of-age participants’ relationships with various liquors and how these associations influence their in-store decision making.

Though these advantages were particularly evident given the unique variables at play in this study, these benefits can be found and exploited in a wide variety of industries and with a broad set of research objectives, regardless of the community’s size and scope. Continue reading

My New Favourite Question

Not long ago I found myself in the midst of what was disguised as a quick online survey but proved to be a significant investment of my time. I opted in because I wanted to contribute; I opted out because I didn’t want to contribute that much.

Striking the right balance between workload and incentive is difficult.  When I’m working with a team that’s new to research communities I can, understandably, expect to hear at least one question dealing with this dilemma:

“How many questions should/can I ask in a day?”
“How much time can I expect participants to spend contributing to the community on a given day?”
“Is X enough incentive for Y time spent?”

I can provide some broad guidelines based on my exposure to other communities but I always conclude with a confident, “it depends.” The answers to these questions depend on a number of variables: demographics, subject matter, incentive offered etc. Continue reading

Customer Insight Communities to Support Real-Time Decision Making (webinar recording)

ama logo

Each year we have the pleasure of presenting a webinar to the American Marketing Association. Last week we delivered a session on “Customer Insight Communities to Support Real-Time Decision Making”. In particular, we covered:

  • What insight communities are and how they can be designed and used to gather valuable and timely insights.
  • Innovative ways to engage customers using insight communities.
  • How qualitative research communities can be applied to business applications.
  • Example case studies to illustrate successful insight communities.

If you missed the session or would like another chance to watch it, we’ve provided a copy of the video below. Don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions or to schedule a private demo and trial account.

Using Research Communities For Brand Loyalty and WOM

One of the first projects I worked on as a marketing researcher was an ad testing study with an automotive company. As the study progressed, I found myself invested in a brand I previously had no stake or interest in. I quickly realized that the brand’s success became, even if in a very minor way, my own success.

I’ve never been a participant in a study similar to the one I mention above, but I would imagine that under the right circumstances, a participant might experience a similar affective response, namely, the emergence or cultivation of brand loyalty. Opening a conversation with participants generates goodwill and emotional generosity. This is not a new idea, but it does leave us with the question, under what circumstances can these feelings and responses be optimized?

Under what circumstances can we cultivate brand loyalty, a sense of ownership, and personal identification during the research process? Continue reading